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Sié Chéou-Kang CenterPrivate Security Monitor

Members of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Afghanistan Engineer District-South conduct inspections while a team provides security.

U.S. Government Research & Oversight

Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction

The 2008 National Defense Authorization Act established the Office of the Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction (SIGAR). SIGAR's mission is to provide independent oversight of the expenditure of funds appropriated for the reconstruction of Afghanistan; detect and deter fraud, waste, and abuse of U.S. funds; and promote actions to increase program efficiency and effectiveness. Afghanistan reconstruction includes U.S. government contracts to provide goods and services to the Afghan people, and often security services are needed either as a primary good (i.e. to build the Afghanistan National Security Forces) or as an accompaniment to U.S. personnel working to establish or reestablish political or societal institutions of Afghanistan. 

SIGAR Audit Reports

Completed Audit Reports

USAID’s Measuring Impacts of Stabilization Initiatives: Program Generally Achieved Its Objectives, but USAID’s Lack of a Geospatial Data Policy and Standards Affected Its Implementation

Author: SIGAR
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This SIGAR audit report found that despite early monitoring and evaluation (M&E) efforts, the standard of USAID stabilization programs enacted by the military contractors, MSI, did not meet initial requirements. MSI noted that USDAID programs [1] did not achieve overall success rate in Afghanistan, [2] insurgents targeted areas where the programs were enacted, and [3] the program should include initiatives aiming to improve literacy rates and empower women, a group that tends to not support US efforts in the country. 

SIGAR recommends for USAID for the organization to establish a policy that implements OMB Circular A-16 requirements in order to improve agency-wide standards for collecting, using, and sharing geospatial data.

Department of Defense spending on Afghanistan reconstruction: Contracts comprised $21 billion OF $66 billion in total appropriations, 2002 – May 2014

Author: SIGAR
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This document, from the SIGAR Office of Special Reports, describes the overall use of contractors by the Department of Defense. The report describes the DoD's reported obligations for $20.6 billion in 18,988 contracts awarded to 2,542 vendors from the Afghan Security Forces Fund (ASFF), the Commander’s Emergency Response Program (CERP), the Afghan Infrastructure Fund (AIF), the Department of Defense Drug Interdiction and Counter-Drug Activities fund (DOD CN), and the Task Force for Business and Stability Operations (TFBSO).

Department of the Army’s Legacy East Project: Jorge Scientific Corporation's Lack of Supporting Documentation Results in about $135 Million in Questionable Project Costs

Author: SIGAR
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This SIGAR audit concerns a $50 million contact awarded to Jorge Scientific Corporation (now Imperatis Corporation) for the implementation of the Legacy East project.  The project provided highly specialized counterinsurgency intelligence experts to train Afghan National Security Forces and bilingual cultural advisors to assist in strengthening Afghanistan's capacity to fight terrorist networks.  The contract's estimated cost rose to $191,135,945.  SIGAR audited $1.75 million in spending on the project to determined any weaknesses in oversight, noncomplicance, and overall performance of Jorge in executing the contract.  The audit uncovered significant weaknesses and instances of noncompliance in addition to $1.34 million in total questionable costs.

Power Grid Project at the Counter Narcotics Strip Mall in Kabul: Construction Met Contract Requirements but Electrical System Was Not Deemed Operable Until More Than 18 Months After Project Completion

Author: SIGAR
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This inspection report examines the construction of a commercial power supply system for a counter narcotics compound in Kabul, Afghanistan. The contract for this project was awarded by the Department of State’s Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs (INL). SIGAR finds that the construction was completed on time and to contract specifications in June of 2013, but was not operational until January of 2015. This delay resulted in extra expenses, but the reasons for the delay were beyond the control of the INL and contractor.

Afghan Special Police Training Center’s Dry Fire Range: Poor Contractor Performance and Poor Government Oversight Led to Project Failure

Author: SIGAR
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In this audit, SIGAR examines a $456,669 contract awarded to Qesmatullah Nasrat Construction Company for the construction of a dry fire range for the Afghan Special Police Training Center as requested by the North Atlantic Treaty Organization Training Mission-Afghanistan.  SIGAR's analysis shows that the range was not constructed according to contract requirements and the buildings began to deteriorate within 4 months of operation.  Use of defective materials, poor management and a lack of oversight are cited as reasons for the project's insufficient result.  SIGAR concludes that the Regional Contracting Center failed to ensure proper design and work at the facility and failed to hold the contractor accountable.

Afghan Mobile Strike Force Vehicles: Contractor Met Requirements, but Long-Term Operation and Maintenance Remain a Concern

Author: SIGAR
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This audit performed by SIGAR is in regards to a contract awarded to Textron for the production and supply of Mobile Strike Force Vehicles and initial operator and maintenance training for the Afghan Mobile Strike Force.  SIGAR finds that while Textron was able to provide the vehicles, tools, and equipment on time and in accordance to the contract requirements, it was not able to provide the necessary training for operation and maintenance.  The report also finds that the DoD exercise limited oversight of Textron activities with Afghan Mobile Strike Force units.  SIGAR recommends that the DoD review its requirements for contract supports at such units and modify its contracts for realistic capabilities for oversight.

Contracting with the Enemy: DOD has Limited Assurance that Contractors with Links to Enemy Groups Are Identified and their Contracts Terminated (SIGAR Audit 13-6)

Author: SIGAR
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SIGAR identified several weaknesses in DOD’s process for implementing Section 841 that prevent the department from having reasonable assurance that U.S. government contracting funds are not being provided to persons and entities supporting the insurgency and opposing U.S. and coalition forces. As a result, millions of contracting dollars could be diverted to forces seeking to harm U.S. military and civilian personnel in Afghanistan and derail the multi-billion dollar reconstruction effort.

Stability in Key Areas (SIKA) Programs: After 16 Months and $47 Million Spent, USAID Had Not Met Essential Program Objectives (SIGAR Audit 13-16)

Author: SIGAR
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This report discusses the results of SIGAR's audit of the U.S. Agency for International Development's Stability in Key Areas (SIKA) programs. SIGAR finds that contractors for the four regional SIKA programs alludes to the lack of an agreement with the Afghan government as the reason for significant delays in program implementation after identifying the sources of instability and potential solutions.

Increases in Security Costs are Likely under the Afghan Public Protection Force: USAID Needs to Monitor Costs and Ensure Unlicensed Security Providers are not Used (SIGAR Audit 12-10)

Author: SIGAR
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Responding to the upcoming transition in Afghanistan from external private security contractors to the internal Afghan Public Protection Force (APPF), the Office of the Inspector General conducted an audit of USAID projects to forecast the potential cost implications of using the APPF. The report finds that costs for security will likely increase, and recommends to USAID to examine its contracts for their security costs, assess upcoming contracts, and take into account the potential problems of a transition to the unique and untested APPF. 

Joint Strategic Oversight Plan for Afghanistan Reconstruction FY 2013

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A joint product of Department of Defense, Department of State, USAID and the Special Inspector for Afghanistan Reconstruction, this report defines a 13 point plan for the future of reconstruction in Afghanistan. Of note is Issue 13, which discusses the plans for improving contractor oversight and efficiency in Afghanistan. The report also briefly discusses the contractors overseeing the Afghan police and military training. 

Afghanistan Public Protection Force: Concerns Remain about Force's Capabilities and Costs (SIGAR Audit 13-15)

Author: SIGAR
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This report discusses the results of SIGAR's audit of the U.S. Agency for International Development's transfer of security functions for its reconstruction projects in Afghanistan from private security contractors to the Afghan Public Protection Force (APPF). SIGAR finds that the average rate for armed local guard services increased as much as 47 percent for projects under the APPF despite the decrease in contracted security costs for the majority of projects.

Alert Letter on Transition to the Afghan Public Protection Force (SIGAR-Alert 12-1)

Author: SIGAR
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SIGAR reviewed the costs associated with private security contractors used by USAID’s implementing partners in Afghanistan during fiscal years 2009-2011 and the extent to which implementing partners will transition security services to the for their offices, housing, and project sites, and for the movement of their personnel to the Afghan Public Protection Force (APPF), and whether the requirement that the APPF be used will result in project termination or money loss. This document includes the audit and USAID's response.  

Kunduz Ana Garrison: Army Corps of Engineers Released Dyncorp of all Contractual Obligations Despite Poor Performance and Structural Failures (SIGAR Inspection 13-1)

Author: SIGAR
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SIGAR inspected the Kunduz Ana Garrison in 2010 and again in 2012. Despite poor structural performance in 2010, SIGAR noted several of the same problems two years later. The report questions why the Army Corps of Engineers released DynCorp from its contract of 70.8 million dollars after their clearly deficient work in constructing the compound. 

  1. US Army Corps of Engineers response

Afghan National Security Forces: Actions Needed to Improve Plans for Sustaining Capability Assessment Efforts

Author: SIGAR
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This report discusses the results of SIGAR’s audit to determine if the International Security Assistance Force (ISAF) consistently applied its tools for evaluating the manning, training, and equipping capacity of the Afghan National Security Forces (ANSF), specifically the Commander’s Unit Assessment Tool. It also discusses the steps ISAF is taking to plan for the continued collection, validation, analysis, and reporting of ANSF capacity assessments during the military drawdown and the transition of security responsibility to the Afghan government.

It includes one recommendation to the ISAF Commander to develop and implement a plan for collecting, validating, analyzing, and reporting ANSF capability assessments that details how ISAF will assess the ANSF’s capability with fewer advisors to conduct the assessments and mitigate the challenges associated with the ANSF reporting on its own assessment results.

Contract Oversight Capabilities of the Defense Department’s Combined Security Transition Command – Afghanistan (CSTC-A) Need Strengthening (SIGAR Audit 09-1)

Author: SIGAR
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According to this report, more than half of all U.S. reconstruction dollars provided for Afghanistan since 2002 have gone into training, equipping, and deploying the Afghan National Security Forces (ANSF). The training is conducted by private contractors. The Combined Security Transition Command - Afghanistan (CSTC-A), in conjunction with the Afghan government and U.S. coalition partners, is responsible for the management of contracts to develop the ANSF. SIGAR’s review found that the CSTC-A does not have the capability to ensure that U.S. funds are managed effectively and spent wisely or to monitor contractor performance.

Special Report to Congress Analysis of Recommendations Concerning Contracting in Afghanistan, as Mandated by Section 1219 of the Fiscal Year 2011 NDAA (SIGAR Audit-11-1SP)

Author: SIGAR
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This report to Congress on the oversight of contractors and plans for reducing the reliance of the U.S. on private security contractors in Afghanistan was required by Section 1219 of the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) for FY 2011. SIGAR (1) analyze the recommendations made to DOD, DoS, and USAID regarding contracting in Afghanistan from FY 2008 through March 2011, and (2) assessed the current situation regarding the use of PMSCs in Afghanistan, including the extent to which PMSCs have been responsible for Afghan civilian deaths. SIGAR found that U.S. agencies continue to rely heavily on PSCs to provide for site, convoy, and personnel security. This is discussed in relation to the transition of security services from PMSCs to Afghan forces. Additionally, SIGAR found that data on Afghan deaths caused by PSCs has not been systematically tracked and may not be complete.

Ongoing Audit Reports

Review of U.S. Agencies’ Use of Contractors To Provide Security for Reconstruction Programs in Afghanistan

Author: SIGAR
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SIGAR is conducting this audit to identify the number and volume of contracts in place to provide security services in Afghanistan. The audit will address these objectives: determine the number of security contractors and personnel working for federal agencies in Afghanistan; assess agencies’ management and oversight of security contractors and subcontractors; determine the extent to which GAO and the inspector general community have conducted audits of private security contracts. It is unclear whether this audit has been completed but is classified; the acting head of SIGAR testified that some audits concerning PSCs are not being released. 

 

SIGAR Quarterly Reports to Congress

2017

SIGAR April Quarterly Report to Congress

Author: SIGAR
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SIGAR's latest quarterly report to Congress includes information on 16 audits, inspections, special projects, and other products, In total, SIGAR's work found $2.1 billion in savings for the U.S. taxpayer. This report also includes an essay detailing how the new administration might reevaluate the policies towards Afghanistan.

SIGAR January Quarterly Report to Congress

Author: SIGAR
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SIGAR's latest quarterly report to Congress includes information on one audit alert, one performance audit, three financial audits and one follow-up inspection reports published in the last quarter of 2016. Also included in the report is an update on the situation in Afghanistan, as well as a report on the continued need for procurement reform in Afghanistan.
2016

SIGAR October 2016 Quarterly Report to Congress

Author: SIGAR
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SIGAR's latest quarterly report to Congress includes information on four inspection reports, six financial audits, and several reports on various topics regarding waste and corruption published between July 1, 2016 and September 30, 2016. Also included in the report is information on ongoing anti-corruption projects and assessments on efforts to strengthen Afghan security forces, enhance good governance, and improve economic and social development.

SIGAR July 2016 Quarterly Report to Congress

Author: SIGAR
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The July report covers the period from April 1 through June 30, and includes a total of 17 audits, inspections, and alert letters, among other products. $10,000 in fines were levied, five companies and eight individuals were referred for suspension or debarment based on findings in SIGAR investigations. SIGAR also initiated 13 new investigations and closed 33, bringing the total number of ongoing investigations to 269.

SIGAR April 2016 Quarterly Report to Congress

Author: SIGAR
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SIGAR's latest quarterly report to Congress includes information on one performance audit, seven financial audits and three inspection reports published between January 1, 2016 through March 31, 2016. Also included in the report is information on the worsening situation on the ground in Afghanistan, as well as five challenges facing the U.S. initiative to develop the Afghan National Defense and Security Forces.

SIGAR January 2016 Quarterly Report to Congress

Author: SIGAR
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In its first quarterly report of 2016, SIGAR provides updates on contractor performance in Afghanistan and describes two performance audits and five financial audits related to the Task Force for Business and Stability Operations, U.S. training efforts, the Afghan National Army’s National Engineer Brigade and nearly $1.8 million in questioned costs as a result of internal-control deficiencies and noncompliance issues.  The report contains detailed accounts of SIGAR investigations, contractor fraud and theft, along with recommendations to increase accountability and oversight of contractors. 
2015

Supplement to SIGAR’s January 2015 Quarterly Report to the United States Congress

Author: SIGAR
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This supplement to SIGAR's first quarterly report of 2015 includes information declassified by the Department of Defense that was not included in the original report. The report contains descriptions of the Afghan National Security Force numbers and strength, NATO contracts for promoting literacy among the Afghan government, among other issues.

SIGAR October 2015 Quarterly Report to Congress

Author: SIGAR
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This quarterly report summarizes SIGAR's oversight efforts from July 1 to September 30, 2015.  SIGAR performed 17 audits, inspections and other assessments and provided recommendations to improve governance and development in Afghanistan.  SIGAR totaled $26.7 million in fines and forfeitures and publicly listed several government companies barred from government contracts and grants.  Several contractors were found to be engaged in price-fixing, bid-rigging, and bribery before the awarding of multi-million dollar contracts for the Afghan Ministry of Defense.  

SIGAR July 2015 Quarterly Report to Congress

Author: SIGAR
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In this third quarterly report of 2015, SIGAR details the results of two performance audits, 11 financial audits and two inspections. Notably, several US contractors were involved in criminal charges including conspiracy to defraud the US government, bribery, money laundering and theft. Further, SIGAR reports on the 2014 investigation of collusion by contractors in bidding for a $1 billion Afghan Ministry of Defense contact for fuel provision.

SIGAR April 2015 Quarterly Report to Congress

Author: SIGAR
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This quarterly report summarizes SIGAR's oversight efforts from January 1st to March 31st, 2015.  SIGAR performed 26 audits, inspections and other assessments and provided recommendations to improve governance and development in Afghanistan.  SIGAR totaled $1.1 million in fines and forfeitures and publicly listed several government companies barred from government contracts and grants.  Several contractors were found to be engaged in price-fixing, bid-rigging, and bribery before the awarding of multi-million dollar contracts for the Afghan Ministry of Defense.  SIGAR is preparing new fraud-awareness briefings for US government staff in order to more easily identify common indicators of contract fraud and corruption.

SIGAR January 2015 Quarterly Report to Congress

Author: SIGAR
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In its first quarterly report of 2015, SIGAR provided updates on contractor performance in Afghanistan, citing issues with coordination and oversight in contractor operations due to a lack of transparency and reporting to the Afghan government.  The report contains detailed accounts of SIGAR investigations, contractor fraud and theft, along with recommendations to increase accountability and oversight of contractors. 

2014

SIGAR October 2014 Quarterly Report to Congress

Author: SIGAR
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This fourth quarterly report of 2014 summarizes Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction (SIGAR)’s oversight work in the hopeful shadow of a peaceful transition of power from President Karzai to newly elected Ashraf Ghani.  However, the report pays special to Afghanistan's unsustainable dependence on foreign and the potentially destabilizing effect that opium production may have on reconstruction efforts.  SIGAR also includes analysis of the impact of reconstruction efforts in security, governance, and economic sectors and its renewed commitment to aggressive oversight of US activities, through 31 audits, inspections, and special projects.  

SIGAR July 2014 Quarterly Report to Congress

Author: SIGAR
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This report summarizes Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction (SIGAR)’s oversight work and updates developments in the three major sectors of Afghanistan’s reconstruction effort from April 1 to June 30, 2014. It also discusses whether the reconstruction is sustainable. During this reporting period, SIGAR published 30 audits, inspections, alert letters, and other reports assessing the U.S. efforts to build the Afghan security forces, improve governance, and facilitate economic and social development. These identified a number of problems, including a lack of accountability, failures of planning, construction deficiencies, and other threats to health and safety. The monetary results from SIGAR’s ongoing investigations totaled $3.1 million from criminal fines, restitutions, forfeitures, contract monies protected, and civil settlement agreements. SIGAR investigations also resulted in two arrests, three criminal informations, three plea agreements, and two sentencings in the United States. In Afghanistan, one subject was arrested, three Afghans were barred from access to military installations, and two government contractors were terminated. SIGAR’s suspension and debarment program referred 16 individuals and 39 companies for suspension or debarment based on allegations that they engaged in fraud and non-performance in contracts valued at over $180 million.

SIGAR January 2014 Quarterly Report to Congress

Author: SIGAR
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In its first quarterly report of 2014, SIGAR provided another update on the security transition from private security companies (PSC) to the Afghan Public Protection Force (APPF). Progress continued to be slow; security for only three forward operating bases had been secured by APPF and 43 by PSC as of December 30, 2013, despite a goal of transferring security for all forward operating bases to APPF by March 30, 2013

SIGAR April 2014 Quarterly Report to Congress

Author: SIGAR
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In its second quarterly report of 2014, SIGAR reported that very little progress had been made in transitioning facility and convoy services from private security companies (PSC) to the Afghan Public Protection Force (APPF). As of March 31, 2014, APPF was providing security for five forward operating bases, only two more than at the end of 2013. PSCs were still defending 43, unchanged in the same period.

2013

SIGAR July 2013 Quarterly Report to Congress

Author: SIGAR
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In this quarterly report, SIGAR published a followup on the impact of the transition from private security companies to the Afghan Public Protection Force (APPF) on USAID reconstruction and assistance programs. In its findings, contracted security costs decreased for more than half the projects in SIGAR's sample following the transition to the APPF. However, SIGAR expressed concerns that relying on the APPF as the sole provider of security services would be ultimately confronted by future unrestrained cost increases.

SIGAR October 2013 Quarterly Report to Congress

Author: SIGAR
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In this report, SIGAR follows up on the current status of private security companies (PSCs) in Afghanistan after the state-owned enterprise Afghan Public Protection Force (APPF) had announced the provision of security services in Afghanistan. Originally, security for military installations was scheduled to be transferred to the APPF in March 2013. However, SIGAR finds meeting this deadline was "extremely unlikely," as 47 out of 50 forward operating bases were still secured by PSCs, as of September 30, 2013.

SIGAR April 2013 Quarterly Report to Congress

Author: SIGAR
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As with previous quarterly reports, the April 2013 quarterly report covers private security only in relation to the transfer of work from security contractors to the Afghan Public Protection Force. SIGAR notes in the report that without U.S. protection, oversight missions will be more difficult to carry out, and that there will be implications for aid activities as well. SIGAR announced that a follow up audit on the impact of the transition to the APPF will be conducted in 2013.

SIGAR January 2013 Quarterly Report to Congress

Author: SIGAR
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In the January report to Congress, SIGAR's discussion of private security contractors focused on the incoming transition from local and foreign companies to the state directed Afghan Public Protection Force (APPF). Scheduled to take over all security operations in early 2012, the APPF is now expected to handle security contracts starting in March 2013. Though it doubled the number of personnel in the last quarter, the APPF is 15,000 personnel short of its 30,000 goal for March. 

2012

SIGAR October 2012 Quarterly Report to Congress

Author: SIGAR
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In this report, the Special Inspector General for Afghanistan identifies the major problems facing accountability in contracting that it has identified, particularly in regards to fuel reimbursements to the Afghan Army and the prevention of bad contractors from receiving further work from the U.S. government. The report briefly discusses the concern for the Afghan Public Protection Force as it enters into greater operations over the next year. 

SIGAR July 2012 Quarterly Report to Congress

Author: SIGAR
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This SIGAR report on the status of the U.S. effort to rebuild Afghanistan found that security costs at reconstruction sites are likely to increase as a result of the mandated transition from private security companies to the state-owned Afghan Public Protection Force. The report also discusses a new work-plan for the agency, as a new Special Inspector General was appointed by the President. 

SIGAR January 2012 Quarterly Report to Congress

Author: SIGAR
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Pages 83-84 of the report address private security contractor personnel working in Afghanistan. The report draws on data from the Department of Defense CENTCOM reports, which shows a decrease in the number of PSCs operating in Afghanistan. Per a government decree, PSCs are to cease operations in the country by March 2011; however the report details findings that the Afghan Public Protection Force is not ready to assume the services undertaken by PMSCs. 

SIGAR April 2012 Quarterly Report to Congress

Author: SIGAR
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In the April 2012 quarterly report to the Congress on U.S. reconstruction in Afghanistan, SIGAR discusses the APPF, a state-owned enterprise established by the Afghan government to replace private security companies, which was to begin assuming responsibility for providing security for development projects during this reporting period. The report addresses the potential for rising costs and the possible disruption or termination of reconstruction projects if the APPF cannot provide the required security.

2011

SIGAR July 2011 Quarterly Report to Congress

Author: SIGAR
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This report summarizes a separate report SIGAR submitted to Congress on the oversight of contractors and plans for reducing the reliance of the United States on private security contractors in Afghanistan. It also reports on two ongoing audits of private security service contracts. Pages 58-60 discuss the status of PSCs in Afghanistan. 

SIGAR April 2011 Quarterly Report to Congress

Author: SIGAR
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In this report, SIGAR announced four new audits, two of which will assess PSC activity: Oversight of contractors and private security contractors (PSCs) as required by the FY 2011 National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA); and the private security services provided by Hart Security Limited as a subcontractor for the Louis Berger Group. Pages 55-56 and 104 discuss the Afghan government’s stance on the continued presence and use of PMSCs in Afghanistan. 

SIGAR January 2011 Quarterly Report to Congress

Author: SIGAR
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This report details planned and ongoing audits of contractor operations in Afghanistan, including PSC contracts and activities. Many of the audits were mandated by Congress in National Defense Authorization Acts. This report also briefly discusses President Karzai’s executive decree banning private security contractors from the county. 

SIGAR October 2011 Quarterly Report to Congress

Author: SIGAR
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SIGAR reports that it completed Audit 11-16S: Audit of a U.S. Agency’s Private Security Contract, but that the findings are not for public release/for official use only. It also announced a new audit is underway to review the costs of PSCs associated with USAID reconstruction programs in Afghanistan. Pages 33 and 74 discuss the ability of Afghan Forces to fulfill the security functions carried out by PMSCs. 

2010

SIGAR July 2010 Quarterly Report to Congress

Author: SIGAR
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This report includes brief summaries about ongoing SIGAR audits into contractors operating in Afghanistan, and summaries of other U.S. agency oversight of contractor activity. 

SIGAR April 2010 Quarterly Report to Congress

Author: SIGAR
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This report including information about ongoing SIGAR audits, including investigations into private security forces.  On page 70, there is a brief discussion of the Afghan Public Protection Force (APPF) that is to replace and carry out the duties of private security companies. 

SIGAR October 2010 Quarterly Report to Congress

Author: SIGAR
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This quarter, SIGAR reported its concerns, on pages 12 and 64, that President Karzai’s decree banning contractors from Afghanistan has the potential to seriously undermine the U.S. reconstruction effort in there. The report also includes information on the “Task Force 2010” operations which uncovered evidence that firms hired to provide security, supplies, and reconstruction work were diverting money to fund insurgency or criminal organizations. During this reporting period, Task Force 2010 identified and subsequently suspended and debarred Watan Risk Management, an Afghan private security contractor that had been funneling large sums of money to insurgents.

2009

SIGAR April 2009 Quarterly Report to Congress

Author: SIGAR
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A large portion of this report is dedicated to explaining the SIGAR mission, goals, and structure. SIGAR’s authorizing legislation calls for it to review the use of specific contractors and conduct targeted audits of individual contracts. While some audits were underway by the time this report was issued, SIRAR reports that a series of audits of the use of security contractors would not begin until June 2009.

SIGAR January 2009 Quarterly Report to Congress

Author: SIGAR
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Building on the information provided in the first report of October 2008, this submission provides a summary of oversight reports on Afghanistan reconstruction since 2002, discusses initial SIGAR observations on some of the challenges to Afghanistan reconstruction, and concludes by outlining SIGAR’s methodology for oversight.

SIGAR July 2009 Quarterly Report to Congress

Author: SIGAR
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This report contains general information about the security situation in Afghanistan and the progress of security-sector reform, but does not directly address the role of PMSCs in these developments. 

SIGAR October 2009 Quarterly Report to Congress

Author: SIGAR
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On page 4 and in its discussion of ongoing audits, SIGAR reports that it received several complaints that allege some private security is being provided by people connected to the Taliban. Therefore SIGAR began an audit reviewing how the U.S. Government and reconstruction contractors are providing for their security.

2008

SIGAR October 2008 Quarterly Report to Congress

Author: SIGAR
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This is the first report to Congress issued by SIGAR. It provides a summary of funds devoted to the reconstruction of Afghanistan since 2001; a review of relevant U.S. and international laws and agreements which govern the approach to the reconstruction of Afghanistan; and a status report on the establishment of SIGAR as an independent oversight agency.

Other SIGAR Documents

2017

2017 High-Risk List

Author: SIGAR
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This interactive web platform unveiled by the Special Inspector General details the high-risk issues that make up some of the most significant challenges still facing Afghanistan.
2016

Lessons From the Coalition: International Experiences From the Afghanistan Reconstruction

Author: SIGAR
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Second in a series of lessons learned reports, Lessons from the Coalition looks at the experiences of the various members of the coalition forces in order to evaluate possible best practices used by other nations. SIGAR's analysis determined four major themes that each nation found to be essential to engaging in reconstruction: bridging the gap between conflicting actors and goals, mobilizing effective donor coordination, using local knowledge and encouraging local buy-in to improve chances of project success, and understanding the need to create adaptable, integrated civilian and military entities that are allowed to take risks and be flexible for future reconstruction efforts.

Corruption in Conflict: Lessons from the U.S. Experience in Afghanistan

Author: SIGAR
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First in a series of lessons learned reports, Corruption in Conflict looks at the role of corruption in the U.S.-Afghanistan conflict and how various U.S. governmental agencies understood and responded to that corruption. SIGAR's analysis determined that corruption undermined the U.S. mission in the country in all sectors of reconstruction from the very beginning. U.S. reconstruction efforts are likely to continue to be subverted or fail all together due to ongoing systemic corruption.

Department of Defense Reconstruction Projects: Summary of SIGAR Inspection Reports Issued from July 2009 through September 2015

Author: SIGAR
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This SIGAR report covers 36 inspection reports dating from 2009 to 2015, valued at approximately $1.1 billion. The objective in analyzing these past reports was to evaluate whether contractors fulfilled their contract requirements and specifications, whether the inspected facilities were being used, and whether DOD took past inspection reports into consideration. The findings are varied, however only about one-third of projects inspected met contract requirements.
2015

Improving the Effectiveness of U.S. Reconstruction Efforts in Afghanistan by Enhancing Oversight and Addressing Key Areas of High Risk: Statement by John F. Sopko, Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction

Author: SIGAR
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This document contains a statement by John F. Sopko, Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction, to the Senate Committee on Appropriations, Subcommittee on the Department of State, Foreign Operations, and Related Programs. This statement summarizes SIGAR’s FY2016 budget request, recent successes from SIGAR’s ongoing work, the challenges SIGAR has in accomplishing its mission, and steps being taken to overcome these challenges. In addition, the statement describes key management and program challenges facing State and USAID, as well as DOD, by highlighting areas of high risk that SIGAR has identified.

Why ANSF Numbers Matter: Inaccurate and Unreliable Data, and Limited Oversight of On Budget Assistance Put Millions of U.S. Taxpayer Dollars at Risk - Testimony from John F. Sopko, Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction

Author: SIGAR
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This document contains the testimony of John F. Sopko, Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction, to the House Subcommittee on National Security, Committee on Oversight and Government Reform regarding SIGAR's work examining the Afghan National Security Forces (ANSF) personnel and payroll data and the Afghan government’s capacity to manage and account for U.S. onbudget assistance. Sopko discusses numerous contracts, granted by US government agencies as well as the United Nations, within his testimony.
2014

February 2015 Final Assessment: What We Have Learned From Our Inspections of Incinerators and Use of Burn Pits in Afghanistan

Author: SIGAR
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During operations in Afghanistan, the US military used fire pits and incinerators to dispose of solid waste, causing concerns over potential health and environmental consequences if done improperly.  SIGAR conducted a final assessment of these disposal methods and provides lessons learned in this document.  Specifically, SIGAR states that action must be taken to increase accountability and management of waste disposal contracts. Agencies are recommended to be vigilant in ensuring that contractors are compensated properly when work is done correctly as proper execution of incineration and maintenance of disposal sites are critical for health and safety.

Department of Defense Spending on Afghanistan Reconstruction: Contracts Comprised $21 Billion of $66 Billion in Total Appropriations, 2002 – May 2014

Author: SIGAR
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This report was produced by SIGAR's Office of Special Reports and examines total spending by the Department of Defense in Afghanistan efforts between 2002 and 2014.  The report finds that the DoD has spent $21 billion on contract obligations of the Department's total obligations of $56 billion. Reasons for this discrepancy are stated clearly: fund appropriated for reconstruction are often marked for other purposes such as transfer within the DoD or between the DoD, other US agencies, and the Afghan government.  Further, reporting gaps prior to 2010 also account for missing data on DoD contracts.  Difficulties in tracking financial data are cited as causes for discrepancies as well.  The report also details many of the large-scale infrastructure projects, economic development projects, and counternarcotics efforts funded by the DoD.

Letter from John F. Sopko (Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction) to Lt General Thomas P. Bostick and William Hammink (USAID Mission Director for Afghanistan)

Author: John F. Sopko
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This is a letter from John F. Sopko, the Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction, to Lieutenant General Thomas P. Bostick, Commanding General and Chief of Engineers for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, and Mr. William Hammink, the USAID Mission Director for Afghanistan.  Mr. Sopko writes to inquire about the termination of a U.S. Army Corps of Engineers contract with Perini Management Services.  Perini had been contracted to provide services for the South East Power System program.  However, Mr. Sopko looks to verify the reason for the contracts termination and whether or not there is another plan for completing the work by another contractor.

Letter from John F. Sopko (Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction) to Steven F. Gaffney (CEO of DynCorp International)

Author: John F. Sopko
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This letter from Mr. John F. Sopko, the Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction, to Mr. Steven F. Gaffney, the Chairman and CEO of DynCorp International Inc., informs Mr. Gaffney of SIGAR's initiative to combat human trafficking in connection with the Logistics Civil Augmentation Program with which DynCorp has been contracted to work in Afghanistan.  SIGAR special agents are participating in interviews with third country nationals (TNCs) hired by DynCorp.  Mr. Sopko expresses SIGAR's concern that TNCs may be victims of deceptive recruitment practices.

Letter from John F. Sopko (Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction) to US Army Major Generals O'Donnell and Harrison

Author: John F. Sopko
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This is a letter from Mr. John F. Sopko, the Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction, to Major General Kevin G. O'Donnell, the Commanding General for U.S. Army Sustainment Command, and Major General Theodore C. Harrison, the Commanding General fro U.S. Army Contracting Command. Mr. Sopko calls attention to the two Commands' limited action to address reports of human trafficking of third country nationals (TNCs) hired as contractors. SIGAR has identified deceptive recruitment practices and mistreatment of TNCs and requests several documents.