Skip navigation

Sié Chéou-Kang CenterPrivate Security Monitor

Meeting at the UN Headquarters in Geneva, Switzerland.

Global Efforts

Open-ended Working Group

The United Nations Human Right Council, on 1 October 2010, adopted resolution 15/26 by which it established an open-ended intergovernmental working group to consider the possibility of elaborating an international regulatory framework on the regulation, monitoring and oversight of the activities of private military and security companies. The open-ended working group has the option to expand on the draft text proposed by the Working Group on the use of mercenaries. All UN Member and Observer States, intergovernmental organizations and non-governmental organizations with ECOSOC consultative status may attend working group sessions.

Visit the website of the Open-Ended Working Group


Documents from the First Session

The first session of the UN open-ended intergovernmental working group to consider the possibility of elaborating an international regulatory framework on the regulation, monitoring and oversight of the activities of private military and security companies was held from 23 to 27 May 2011.

Pre-session Documents

Draft of a possible Convention on Private Military and Security Companies (PMSCs) for consideration and action by the Human Rights Council 

Author: UN Open-ended Intergovernmental Working Group
Publish Date:

 
Open PDF:
 

This Draft Convention to regulate the activities of PMSCs was prepared by the UN Working Group on the Use of Mercenaries, and in 2011 came under consideration by a newly-formed open-ended intergovernmental working group to consider the possibility of elaborating an international regulatory framework on the regulation, monitoring and oversight of the activities of private military and security companies.

In Session Documents

Presentation of Mr. Alexander Nikitin, member of the Working Group on the Use of Mercenaries, to the First Session of the UN Open-Ended Intergovernmental Working Group

Author: Alexander Nikitin
Publish Date:

 
Open PDF:
 

Mr. Alexander Nikitin discussed the regulation of PMSCs activities at the national and regional levels. He referred to national regulation in a number of countries, and at the regional level, he mentioned, among others, the Organization of African States Convention on the Elimination of Mercenarism in Africa, as well as the model law adopted in the context of the Commonwealth of Independent States, and recommendations on the democratic control of security forces in the context of the Council of Europe. He concluded that the existing regulation of PMSCs at the national, regional and international levels remains insufficient and inadequate. 

Presentation of Ms Amada Benavides de Pérez, member of the Working Group on the Use of Mercenaries, to the First Session of the UN Open-Ended Intergovernmental Working Group

Author: Amada Benavides de Perez
Publish Date:

 
Open PDF:
 

Ms. Amada Benavides de Perez discussed PMSCs in the Latin American context, where the growth in the number of security companies has led to an increase in the use of lethal force, the number of weapons in circulation, and the number of private security officers in comparison to national police officers. She discussed elements of proposed international and national regulation of PMSCs, including a definition of the type of services that PMSCs can offer; clarification of the relationship between PMSCs and national forces; the obligation for PMSCs to respect human rights; and the establishment of a system of accountability for the activities of PMSCs and their personnel. 

Submission by the Working Group on the Use of Mercenaries to the First Session of the UN Open-Ended Intergovernmental Working Group (A/HRC/WG.10/1/CRP.1)

Author: UN Open-ended Intergovernmental Working Group
Publish Date:

 
Open PDF:
 

This report, titled “Why we need an International Convention on Private Military and Security Companies (PMSCs),” was submitted to the UN open-ended intergovernmental working group to consider the possibility of elaborating an international regulatory framework on the regulation, monitoring and oversight of the activities of private military and security companies at its first session. It states that self-regulation, current national laws, and international law are all insufficient and do not effectively regulate PMSC activity.

Statement of the World Federation of Trade Unions (WFTU) , to the First Session of the UN Open-Ended Intergovernmental Working Group

Author: World Federation of Trade Unions
Publish Date:

 
Open PDF:
 

This document from the World Federation of Trade Unions announces their position in support of improved regulation of private security companies. The WFTU describes the current deficiencies in regulating PMSCs and the challenge they present to state power and sovereignty across the globe.

Statement of the International Commission of Jurists (ICJ), to the First Session of the UN Open-Ended Intergovernmental Working Group

Author: International Commission of Jurists
Publish Date:

 
Open PDF:
 

In its statement, the ICJ expressed its support for the opening of inter-governmental discussions about the possibility of elaborating an international regulatory framework for PMSCs, and rejected the argument made by some actors that self-regulation by companies is sufficient in the military, security and policing sector. 

Presentation of Mr. José Luis Gomez del Prado, member of the Working Group on the Use of Mercenaries, to the First Session of the UN Open-Ended Intergovernmental Working Group

Author: José Luis Gomez del Prado
Publish Date:

 
Open PDF:
 

Mr. del Prado referred to the main elements of the draft convention prepared by the Working Group on the Use of Mercenaries. He explained the structure of the draft convention, noting that among other things, the draft convention defines which functions of states cannot be outsourced. He also explained the rationale and functioning of an international committee on the regulation, oversight and monitoring of PMSCs.

Statement of the United Nations' Children Fund (UNICEF) to the First Session of the UN Open-Ended Intergovernmental Working Group

Author: United Nations' Children Fund (UNICEF)
Publish Date:

 
Open PDF:
 

UNICEF recalled that since June 2010 it has been leading an initiative to develop a set of principles for business on children’s rights. These principles call on businesses to respect and support children’s rights and to avoid complicity in children’s rights abuses. They are also relevant to the activities of private security companies, especially with regard to how companies understand, prevent and address any negative impact of their activities on children. 

Presentation of Ms Amada Benavides de Pérez, member of the Working Group on the Use of Mercenaries, to the First Session of the UN Open-Ended Intergovernmental Working Group

Author: Amada Benavides de Perez
Publish Date:

 
Open PDF:
 

In her presentation, Ms. Amada Benavides elaborated on individual cases that had been brought to the attention of the Working Group on the Use of Mercenaries in relation to accountability of PMSCs. She also discussed how the Montreux Document requires that contracting, territorial and home states enact legislation to sanction violations of international humanitarian law and bring to justice members of the PMSCs that committed other crimes under international law. 

Presentation of Ms Anne-Marie Buzatu, Programme Coordinator, Geneva Centre for the Democratic Control of Armed Forces (DCAF) to the First Session of the UN Open-Ended Intergovernmental Working Group

Author: Anne-Marie Buzatu
Publish Date:

 
Open PDF:
 

Anne-Marie Buzatu identified the key challenges to the regulation of the activities of private security companies. Among those, she mentioned the lack of coherent international standards, democratic and state responsibility deficits and lack of independent oversight and effective accountability mechanisms. Ms. Buzatu discussed the International Code of Conduct for Private Security Service Providers, the result of a multi-stakeholder process that sets out obligations and operational standards for private security service providers based on international human rights law. 

Presentation of Mr. Alexander Nikitin, member of the Working Group on the Use of Mercenaries, to the First Session of the UN Open-Ended Intergovernmental Working Group

Author: Alexander Nikitin
Publish Date:

 
Open PDF:
 

Mr. Nikitin explained that the main principles and elements underlying the draft convention were that states should establish a system of registration for PMSCs that is separate from regular businesses and that they should prohibit the registration of PMSCs off-shore zones. The proposed convention would also create a United Nations based international register for PMSCs and would seek to apply the experience acquired in the context of the UN Register for Conventional Arms. 

Post-session Documents

Summary of the first session of the UN Open-Ended Working Group (A/HRC/WG.10/1/4/)

Author: UN Open-ended Intergovernmental Working Group
Publish Date:

 
Open PDF:
 

This report summarizes the first meeting of the UN open-ended intergovernmental working group to consider the possibility of elaborating an international regulatory framework on the regulation, monitoring and oversight of the activities of private military and security companies. It discusses presentations and discussions on the law and practice in relation to PMSCs; the elements of an international regulatory framework of activities of PMSCs; and accountability and right to an effective remedy for victims.

Documents from the Second Session

The second session of the UN open-ended intergovernmental working group to consider the possibility of elaborating an international regulatory framework on the regulation, monitoring and oversight of the activities of private military and security companies was held from 13 to 17 August 2012, at the Palais des Nations in Geneva.

After having discussed inter alia the work of the UN Working Group on Mercenaries, the UN Guiding Principles, the Montreux Document and the International Code of Conduct for Private Security Service Providers, the over 50 governments that attended the meeting reached consensus on recommendations to the Human Rights Council. These include to continue the substantive discussion in the open-ended inter-governmental working group with the participation of experts and all relevant stakeholder for a further two year period as well as that it consider both the possibility of an international regulatory framework, and also other approaches and strategies, including international standards, and the way in which they might interact to protect human rights. The Human Rights Council will review the report of this second session in its 22nd session in February/March 2013.Pre-session Documents

In-session Documents

Submission by the Working Group on the Use of Mercenaries (A/HRC/WG.10/2/CRP.1)

Author: UN Working Group on the Use of Mercenaries
Publish Date:

 
Open PDF:
 

In this paper from the Working Group on the Use of Mercenaries, the WG argues that an international convention is the best method for regulating the use of PMSCs. The paper outlines the Working Group's reasons for advocating an international convention, including the conceptual and practical problems of other possible solutions that led the Working Group to their conclusion. 

US Statement on Existing Initiatives Including the Montreux Document and the International Code of Conduct

Author: US Delegation
Publish Date:

 
Open PDF:
 

In this statement, the US delegation expresses its support for the Montreux Document and the International Code of Conduct. In addition, they think there remains room to discuss additional measures that could be taken to reduce the risk of, or ensure accountability for, human rights related impacts of PSC or PMC activity, including under the auspices of the Human Rights Council. But they add that any such discussion should complement the Montreux Document and the Code.

The Option of Elaborating a Legally Binding Instrument

Author: James Cockayne
Publish Date:

 
Open PDF:
 

In this submission to the second session, James Cockayne asks and answers a simple question: “is a single international, legally binding instrument the way to achieve that enforcement [of PSCs]?” The paper recommends that the open ended working group use the Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights as its framework for developing legally binding instruments for regulating the private security industry, as opposed to other initiatives like the Working Group on Mercenaries draft convention or the Montreux Document.

Norwegian Statement to the Second Session of the UN Open-Ended Intergovernmental Working Group

Author: Norwegian Delegation
Publish Date:

 
Open PDF:
 

In this statement, the Norwegian delegation notes that it is imperative that the activities of PMSCs are properly regulated. However, Norway cautions against discussing this issue with the exclusive goal of elaborating a legally binding instrument. Rather, it suggests that the working Group should also consider other ways of regulating the activities of PMSCs. 

Submission of the International Commission of Jurists (ICJ) to the Second Session

Publish Date:

 
Open PDF:
 

The submission from the ICJ identifies the nature and scope of the human rights issues that emerge from PMSCs activities and assesses the extent to which the existing international regulatory framework provides sufficient answers to those challenges. It also outlines a position about the form and content that a new international instrument should take to address those problems.

Post-session Documents

Report of the Second Session of the UN Open-Ended Working Group (A/HRC/22/41)

Publish Date:

 
Open PDF:
 

In this report, the Open Ended Working Group relates the events of the meeting of 13-17 August 2012. The Working Group discussed the possibility of a binding instrument to govern private security services, but did not come to a consensus. The meeting also elaborated the self-regulation mechanisms available and the necessity of creating a clear delineation between PMSC and mercenary. 

Documents from the Third Session

The third session of the UN open-ended intergovernmental working group to consider the possibility of elaborating an international regulatory framework on the regulation, monitoring and oversight of the activities of private military and security companies was held from 21 to 25 July 2014, at the Palais des Nations in Geneva.  The session was originally scheduled for December of 2013, but was rescheduled after the passing of Nelson Mandela.

Representatives from 60 governments, as well as non-governmental organizations and experts in the field attended the session. The Working Group discussed the distinction between services provided by private military and private security companies, noting the range of activities performed by these organizations and suggesting a comprehensive definition of PMSCs be established. Participants also reviewed existing national legislation for the registration, licensing and contracting of PMSCs and assess the lack uniformity in law at the national level that may be ameliorated by an international legal instrument with specific human rights criteria. The Working Group also discussed the possibility of a legally binding regulatory instrument or international standard that will ensure protection of human rights in regards to the use of PMSCs.  

Pre-session Documents

Report of the open-ended intergovernmental working group to consider the possibility of elaborating an international regulatory framework on the regulation, monitoring and oversight of the activities of private military and security companies on its second session

Author: UN Open-ended Intergovernmental Working Group
Publish Date:

 
Open PDF:
 
This report, generated after the Working Group's second session was used as a pre-session document for the third session as many of the issues discussed in previous sessions were reiterated in the third. In this report, the Open Ended Working Group relates the events of the meeting of 13-17 August 2012. The Working Group discussed the possibility of a binding instrument to govern private security services, but did not come to a consensus. The meeting also elaborated the self-regulation mechanisms available and the necessity of creating a clear delineation between PMSC and mercenary. 
Post-session Documents

Summary of the third session of the open-ended intergovernmental working group to consider the possibility of elaborating an international regulatory framework on the regulation, monitoring and oversight of the activities of private military and security companies

Author: UN Open-ended Intergovernmental Working Group
Publish Date:

 
Open PDF:
 
This document summarizes the third session of the open-ended intergovernmental working group on PMSCs, which was attended by representatives of 60 countries.  The Group discussed developments since the second session, including regulatory gaps at national and international levels, the expansion of the International Code of Conduct, and updating of the Montreux Document.  The third session consisted mostly of discussions around consideration of human rights and the activities of PMSCs.  Members spoke on national registration, licensure, and contracting of PMSCs as well as accountability and assistance for victims. The possibility of an international regulatory framework, including standards or a legally binding law, was also debated.

Documents from the Fourth Session

The fourth session of the UN open-ended intergovernmental working group to consider the possibility of elaborating an international regulatory framework on the regulation, monitoring and oversight of the activities of private military and security companies was held from 27 April to 1 May 2015, at the Palais des Nations in Geneva.

Representatives from governments, as well as non-governmental organizations and experts in the field attended the session. Also in attendance was the Chair of the Working Group on the use of mercenaries as a means of violating human rights and impeding the exercise of the right of peoples to self-determination to discuss the relationship between PMSCs and mercenary activities.  

Pre-session Documents

Provisional Programme of Work

Author: UN Open-ended Intergovernmental Working Group
Publish Date:

 
Open PDF:
 
This provisional agenda sets out the course of events for the first meeting of the UN open-ended intergovernmental working group to consider the possibility of elaborating on the regulation of sea-based PMSC activities and the use of PMSCs by the United Nations.
In-session Documents

4th Session of the IGWG on Private Military Security Companies Presentation by Paul Gibson Director SCEG on 28th April 2015

Author: Paul Gibson, Director SCEG
Publish Date:

 
Open PDF:
 
This statement by Paul Gibson, the director of the Security in Complex Environment Group (SCEG), addresses the complexity of PMSC use as well as the evolution of his group and its relationship with the UK government, ICoCA, and other standards organizations. SCEG was formed in 2011 for UK-based private security companies working abroad in dangerous environments.  The goal of the organization is to promote professional standards in the UK PMSC industry and provide a framework for sharing best practices and accreditation.  This statement outlines the SCEG's operations in several fields including maritime security, third party audits and firearms training in the UK.

Concluding remarks by Ambassador Abdul S. Minty, the Chair of the Working Group on the use of mercenaries

Author: Ambassador Abdul S. Minty, Chairperson-Rapporteur WG on mercenaries
Publish Date:

 
Open PDF:
 
This statement by Ambassador Abdul S. Minty, the Chairperson-Rapporteur for the Working Group on mercenaries, brings a close to the Working Group on PMSCs' Fourth Session in May 2015.  The Chairperson particularly calls attention to the use of private security and "floating armories" being used for maritime security concerns. Also included is a draft text to conclude the Working Group's session and provide recommendations as required in a report to the Human Rights Council.

Statement by the International Code of Conduct for Private Security Providers’ Association

Author: International Code of Conduct Association
Publish Date:

 
Open PDF:
 
This statement by the International Code of Conduct Association outlines the organization's primary functions and areas of development. The ICoCA expects a greater role in reporting, monitoring and assessment development through consultations with PMSCs and human rights organizations.  The group anticipates that a report will be presented as a Draft Procedure to the General Assembly in early 2016. Discussions with governments and private industry clients have also explored the possibility of ICoCA membership becoming a requirement for contracting. For instance, the U.S. Department of State has expressed interesting in requiring ICoCA membership as a Mandatory Minimum Requirement for its Worldwide Protection Services program.

4th Session of the IGWG on Private Military Security Companies Presentation by Stuart Maslen, Researcher, University of Pretoria, on 29th April 2015

Author: Stuart Maslen, Researcher, University of Pretoria
Publish Date:

 
Open PDF:
 
Stuart Maslen addresses the use of private security in maritime contexts in his statement to the Working Group.  Acknowledging that the use of PMSCs for armed protection of commercial shipping has reduced the number of successful acts of piracy, he also comments on the inherent risks of weapons onboard ships - including risks to crew members and in regards to state's obligations under international law. Further, monitoring and oversight are particularly difficult in maritime contexts. Maslen also addresses international laws and national legislation regarding maritime security and examines several cases studies from the United Kingdom, Australia and the United States.

Country Statements during the Fourth Session of the Inter-governmental Working Group on Private Military and Security Companies

Author: Representatives of member countries
Publish Date:

 
At the Fourth Session of the Working Group on PMSCs, countries were invited to give statements regarding their positions on the regulation of PMSCs and the possibility of a legally binding document. These statements are provided below and all documents are in English unless noted otherwise.

UN Guidelines on the Use of Armed Security Services from Private Security Companies

Author: UN Department of Safety and Security
Publish Date:

 
Open PDF:
 
Published in 2012, this document from the UN Security Management System's Operations Manual was used during the Working Group's Fourth Session in 2015.  This chapter outlines guidelines on the use of armed private security services and should be read in conjunction with the UN Security Management System Policy on Armed Private Security Companies.  In exceptional circumstances when the UN is unable to use host government security services, or security provided by member states, armed private security companies may be considered.  These guidelines provide details on the requirements and processes for hiring armed private security companies.  

Opening Remarks by Ms. Flavia Pansieri Deputy High Commissioner

Author: UN Working Group on the Use of Mercenaries
Publish Date:

 
Open PDF:
 
In her opening statement to the Working Group on PMSCs, Deputy High Commissioner Flavia Pansieri outlines several recent developments including: the establishment of an open-ended intergovernmental working group on transnational corporations and other business enterprises with respect to human rights and an upcoming report on legal options and practical measures to improve access to remedy for victims of business-related human rights abuses.  The Deputy High Commissioner also reiterates the importance of the Working Group's efforts in promoting regulation of PMSCs.

UN Security Management System Policy on Armed Private Security Companies

Author: UN Department of Safety and Security
Publish Date:

 
Open PDF:
 
This chapter from the UN Security Policy Manual was published in 2008 and referenced during the Working Group's Fourth Session in 2015. Chapter IV discusses the use of armed private security companies in the protection of UN personnel, their families, and UN property.  When services are not available from host governments, the UN first turns to member nations for these services and only hires armed private security only in exceptional circumstances. This chapter outlines the circumstances when armed private security may be considered and the decision making framework for the hiring of private companies and should be read alongside the UN Guidelines on the Use of Armed Security Services from Private Security Companies.

Concept Note on a Possible Legally Biding Instrument for the Regulation of Private Military Security Companies

Author: UN Working Group on the Use of Mercenaries
Publish Date:

 
Open PDF:
 
This concept note, written by the UN Working Group on the Use of Mercenaries contributes to the discussion of the creation of a legally binding instrument on private military and security companies.  Through its research to identify trends and gaps in national legislation, the WG on Mercenaries concludes that there is substantial variation in the kind and quality of regulation of PMSCs on a global scale.  The document notes that some activities are, and should be, reserved for the state - including participation in armed conflict and the detention and interrogation of prisoners of war.  Thus, the WG on Mercenaries elaborates on its recommendations for the possible draft legislation. 

Statement of the Chair of the Working Group on the use of mercenaries as a means of violating human rights and impeding the exercise of the right of peoples to self-determination

Author: UN Working Group on the Use of Mercenaries
Publish Date:

 
Open PDF:
 
This statement by the Chair of the Working Group on mercenaries, Ms. Elżbieta Karska, was presented at the fourth session of the intergovernmental Working Group on PMSCs.  In her speech, the Chairperson outlines the activities her Working Group and reiterates the relationship between both groups' areas of work. The Working Group on mercenaries also presented a concept note for the creation of a framework for regulation of PMSCs and outlines several related elements that should be included in the final draft resolution.
Post-session Documents

Report of the open-ended intergovernmental working group to consider the possibility of elaborating an international regulatory framework on the regulation, monitoring and oversight of the activities of private military and security companies on its fourth session

Author: UN Open-ended Intergovernmental Working Group
Publish Date:

 
his document summarizes the third session of the open-ended intergovernmental working group on PMSCs, which was attended by representatives of 48 countries, other UN programmes, intergovernmental organizations and non-governmental organizations. The session included a statement and discussion with a representative of the Security in Complex Environments Group on behalf of private military and security companies. In addition to human rights, the fourth session included discussion on the regulation of sea-based private security activities and the use of private security companies by the United Nations. 

Statement to the Human Rights Council on 17 September 2015, by the Chairperson-Rapporteur of the open-ended intergovernmental working group to consider the possibility of elaborating an international regulatory framework on the regulation, monitoring and oversight of the activities of private military and security companies

Author: UN Open-ended Intergovernmental Working Group
Publish Date:

 
Open PDF:
 
This document summarizes the fourth session of the open-ended intergovernmental working group on PMSCs, which was attended by representatives of 48 countries, other UN programmes, intergovernmental organizations and non-governmental organizations. The session included a statement and discussion with a representative of the Security in Complex Environments Group on behalf of private military and security companies. In addition to human rights, the fourth session included discussion on the regulation of sea-based private security activities and the use of private security companies by the United Nations. 

Documents from the Fifth Session

The fifth session of the UN open-ended intergovernmental working group to consider the possibility of elaborating an international regulatory framework on the regulation, monitoring and oversight of the activities of private military and security companies was held from 12 to 16 December 2016 at the Palais des Nations in Geneva.

Representatives from governments, as well as non-governmental organizations and experts in the field attended the session. Also in attendance was the Chair of the Working Group on the use of mercenaries as a means of violating human rights and impeding the exercise of the right of peoples to self-determination to discuss the relationship between PMSCs and mercenary activities.  Pre-session, in-session, and post-session documents are available below.  

Pre-session Documents

Draft Programme of Work

Author: UN Open-ended Intergovernmental Working Group
Publish Date:

 
Open PDF:
 
This draft programme of work sets out the course of events for this meeting of the UN open-ended intergovernmental working group to consider the possibility of elaborating on the regulation of sea-based PMSC activities and the use of PMSCs by the United Nations.

Provisional Agenda

Author: UN Open-ended Intergovernmental Working Group
Publish Date:

 
This provisional agenda sets out the course of events for this meeting of the UN open-ended intergovernmental working group to consider the possibility of elaborating on the regulation of sea-based PMSC activities and the use of PMSCs by the United Nations.
In-session Documents

NA

Author: UN Working Group on Mercenaries
Publish Date:

 
Country statements from South Africa, India, the European Union, and the United States

Concluding remarks by Ambassador Mxakato-Diseko, the Chair of the Working Group on the use of mercenaries

Author: Ambassador Mxakato-Diseko, Chairperson-Rapporteur WG on mercenaries
Publish Date:

 
Open PDF:
 
This statement by Ambassador Mxakato-Diseko, the Chairperson-Rapporteur for the Working Group on mercenaries, brings a close to the Working Group on PMSCs' Fifth Session in December 2016.  The Chairperson particularly calls attention to the use of private security and maritime security concerns as well as response to victims of PMSC activities.

Presentation by DCAF on national and regional implementation of the norms and good practices stemming from the Montreux Document, the International Code of Conduct for Private Security Service Providers (ICoC), and others, via DCAF’s advisory work in Latin America and the Caribbean

Author: DCAF
Publish Date:

 
Open PDF:
 
This presentation evaluates the national and regional implementation of the norms and good practices developed from the Montreux Document, the International Code of Conduct for Private Security Service Providers (ICoC), and others. These evaluations rely on DCAF’s advisory work in Latin America and the Caribbean.

NA

Author: Dr. Anna Petrig
Publish Date:

 
Open PDF:
 
This statement by Dr. Anna Petrig discusses the unique situation of PMSCs at sea, including the topic of jurisdiction at sea and the issues of deprivation of liberty by PMSCs in the maritime domain.  
Post-session Documents

Summary of the fifth session of the open-ended intergovernmental working group to consider the possibility of elaborating an international regulatory framework on the regulation, monitoring and oversight of the activities of private military and security companies 

Author: UN Working Group on Mercenaries
Publish Date:

 
This document summarizes the fifth session of the open-ended intergovernmental working group on PMSCs, which was attended by representatives of 48 countries, other UN programmes, intergovernmental organizations and non-governmental organizations. In addition to human rights, the fifth session included discussion on the regulation of sea-based private security activities and the response to victims of PMSC overreach and activities. 

Documents from the Sixth Session

The sixth session of the UN open-ended intergovernmental working group to consider the possibility of elaborating an international regulatory framework on the regulation, monitoring and oversight of the activities of private military and security companies was held from 22 to 24 May 2017 at the Palais des Nations in Geneva.

Representatives from governments, as well as non-governmental organizations and experts in the field attended the session. Also in attendance was the Chair of the Working Group on the use of mercenaries as a means of violating human rights and impeding the exercise of the right of peoples to self-determination to discuss the relationship between PMSCs and mercenary activities.  Pre-session and in-session documents are available below.  

Pre-session Documents

Draft Programme of Work

Author: UN Open-ended Intergovernmental Working Group
Publish Date:

 
Open PDF:
 
This draft programme of work sets out the course of events for this meeting of the UN open-ended intergovernmental working group.
In-session Documents

Statement by the European Union

Author: UN Open-ended Working Group on Mercenaries
Publish Date:

 
At the Sixth Session of the Working Group on PMSCs, this statement is was given by the European Union.

Opening statement by Ambassador Nozipho Joyce Mxakato-Diseko, Chairperson-Rapporteur of the intergovernmental working group

Author: UN Open-ended Working Group on Mercenaries
Publish Date:

 
Open PDF:
 
This statement by Ambassador Nozipho Joyce Mxakato-Diseko, Chairperson-Rapporteur of the intergovernmental working group, opens the Sixth Session of the open working group's discussion. It also directs them to focus on how to develop a regulatory framework regarding the of regulatory framework on the regulation, monitoring and oversight of the activities of private military and security companies  and provide recommendations.