Skip navigation

Sié Chéou-Kang CenterPrivate Security Monitor

A mine-action expert from ArmorGroup (left) trains local members of the Nepal and Maoist Armies on the safe removal of unexploded devices.

Data & Statistics

Statistics on the Private Security Industry

This section contains data and statistics on the global private military and security industry, including specific data on contractors working for the United States. The data has been compiled by academic institutions, think tanks, industry associations, and governments. 

Jump to: Global Data  |  United States Data  |  U.S. Department of Labor Statistics  |  CENTCOM Data


GLOBAL DATA


 

 

 


True global statistics on private security contractor use does not currently exist. However, a patchwork of different entities gather data on certain regions or types of states. The Confederation of European Security Services provides statistics for PSCs operating in Europe, while the Freie Universität Berlin focuses on private security in weak and fragile states. Other aggregations of private security data, such as those used in humanitarian operations or the numbers of weapons used also appear in this section. 

Data and Statistics on the Global PMSC Industry

The Private Security Database, Freie Universitat Berlin

Author: Zeljko Branovic
Publish Date:

 

The Private Security Database (PSD) for Areas of Limited Statehood is a quantitative data-gathering project. The PSD project collects data on the use of private military and security companies by public actors and asks in general: who consumed private security in Areas of Limited Statehood (where, how long) and what kind of security was consumed? Visit the PSD website for charts, graphs and statistical analysis of data collected by researchers at the Freie Universitat Berlin. 

Afghanistan Index

Author: Brookings
Publish Date:

 

The Afghanistan Index is a statistical compilation of economic, public opinion and security data. The index provides updated and historical information on various data - including crime, infrastructure, casualties, unemployment, Afghan security forces and coalition troop strength. It is updated every two to three weeks. Note that Brookings also publishes an Iraq Index and Pakistan Index.

Iraq Index

Author: Brookings
Publish Date:

 

The Iraq Index is a statistical compilation of economic, public opinion, and security data. This resource provides updated information on various criteria, including crime, telephone and water service, troop fatalities, unemployment, Iraqi security forces, oil production, and coalition troop strength. Data on contractors is sometimes included. For a full list of private security fatalities, see iCasualty.

A Booming Business: Private Security and Small Arms

Author: Small Arms Survey
Publish Date:

 
Open PDF:
 

This chapter that appears in the publication “Small Arms Survey 2011: States of Insecurity” attempts to shed light on a poorly documented aspect of the global private security industry: its use of arms. While much attention has been devoted to debating the legitimacy of PSCs undertaking what may be considered state functions, less effort has gone into documenting the types of small arms used by PSCs and potential gaps in their control. The chapter examines the scale of the private security industry at the global level, calculates the extent to which it is armed, and asks whether PSC equipment contributes to or threatens security.

Annexe 4.1: A Booming Business: Private Security and Small Arms

Author: Nicolas Florquin
Publish Date:

 
Open PDF:
 

In its 2011 report, "States of Insecurity", Small Arms Survey dedicated Chapter 4 to private security, titling the chapter Booming Business: Private Security and Small Arms. In this Annex to Chapter 4, the extensive data provided in the report is given with the citations for each source of data. 

The Privatisation of Security in Failing States: A Quantitative Assessment

Author: Zeljko Branovic
Publish Date:

Partners: DCAF

 
Open PDF:
 

The private sector supplies a broad spectrum of military and security services to governments facing a lack of territorial control and law enforcement capacities. Yet a quantifiable picture of the extent to which these private security services are being used by failing or weak governments and the implications this use might have for the security environment has not been properly painted. This paper aims to fill this gap by presenting statistical findings on the use of private military and security companies (PMSCs) in failing states.  The paper also reviews the literature on the strategic role of PMSCs in contexts of conflict and state failure, and deduces empirically testable propositions and expectations based on the perspective of advocates and critics. This document is part of DCAF Occasional Paper series.

Private Security in Europe - CoESS Facts & Figures 2011

Author: CoESS
Publish Date:

 
Open PDF:
 

This report of the Confederation of European Security Services (CoESS) is an update of CoESS Facts & Figures 2008 analysis. It provides a comprehensive overview of the European private security services landscape and targets a wide geographical area of 34 countries, i.e. the 27 EU Member States and seven additional European countries: Bosnia & Herzegovina, Croatia, Macedonia, Norway, Serbia, Switzerland and Turkey. It provides an updated and accurate outline of the private security services sector focusing on the legal, social and economic realities within these countries and looks to identify similarities and differences between them.

The Use of Private Security Providers and Services in Humanitarian Operations

Author: Abby Stoddard et al.
Publish Date:

 
Open PDF:
 

A 2008 global survey of aid organizations conducted for this research revealed that the contracting of certain security functions to external professionals has become increasingly common among humanitarian operations worldwide. This trend has followed both the rise in aid worker violence and the proliferation of international private security companies around the operations in Iraq and Afghanistan. Yet despite alarming predictions, the use of armed protection by security contractors remains the exception and is confined to a small number of contexts.

Private Security in Europe - CoESS Facts & Figures 2008

Author: CoESS
Publish Date:

 
Open PDF:
 

CoESS’ study on ‘Private Security in Europe – CoESS Facts & Figures’ provides a comprehensive overview of the European private security services industry.  The study covers a wide geographical area targeting a total of 34 countries, i.e. the 27 EU Member States as well as 7 other European countries: Bosnia & Herzegovina, Croatia, Macedonia, Norway, Serbia, Switzerland and Turkey. It provides an updated and accurate outline of the private security services sector focusing on the legal, social and economic realities within these countries and a statistical summary of the private security industry in each country. 

Private Security in Europe - CoESS Facts & Figures 2004

Author: CoESS
Publish Date:

 
Open PDF:
 

CoESS and UNI-Europa, produced this 2004 overview of the private security industry in all 25 EU Member States. It aims to provide a general outline of the current situation of the private security industry in the individual Member States by providing a statistical summary of the private security industry in each EU country. 


UNITED STATES DATA




 

 

 

 

 

 


The United States is the world's largest consumer of private military and security services, and as such there exists a large amount of data and analysis of the government's use of security contractors. While the U.S. government collects data on contractor personnel numbers deployed in Afghanistan, Iraq, and the U.S. Central Command area of responsibility through the use of its SPOT Tracking System, that data is largely classified. What is available—whether through government disclosures, government reports or independent investigative journalism—appears below, organized by topic.

Contractor Hiring and Payment Information

Federal Procurement Data System

Author: U.S. GSA
Publish Date:

 

To comply with federal requirements for contract data reporting, federal agencies use the Federal Procurement Data System, a government-wide online contract reporting system.  Awarded contract actions are reported daily to the Federal Procurement Data System and then added to the publicly-available USASpending.gov after a 90-day delay to ensure security of current and imminent military operations.

USASpending.gov

Author: U.S. OMB
Publish Date:

 

The Federal Funding Accountability and Transparency Act requires that the Office of Management and Budget establish a single searchable website, accessible to the public at no cost, which includes for each Federal contract award: the name of the entity receiving the award; the amount of the award; information on the award including transaction type, funding agency, etc.; and the location of the entity receiving the award. USAspending.gov was first launched in December 2007 to fulfill these requirements. The information shown on the website is provided directly by federal agencies.

Contractor Fraud, Waste and Abuse

Federal Contractor Misconduct Database

Author: Project On Government Oversight (POGO)
Publish Date:

 

The Project On Government Oversight (POGO) provides data on instances of misconduct such as contract fraud by U.S. government contractors. 

Excluded Party List System (EPLS)

Author: US GSA
Publish Date:

 

The Excluded Parties List System (EPLS) is maintained by the U.S. General Services Administration. The EPLS is an electronic, web-based system that identifies those parties excluded from receiving Federal contracts, certain subcontracts, and certain types of Federal financial and nonfinancial assistance and benefits.  The user is able to search, view, and download both current and archived lists of suspended and debarred contractors.

Number of Contractors in Iraq and Afghanistan

U.S. Department of Defense Census Statistics by Fiscal Year Quarter, Contractor Support of U.S. Operations in the U.S. CENTCOM Area of Responsibility, Iraq and Afghanistan

Author: U.S. Department of Defense
Publish Date:

 

These reports contain DOD contractor personnel numbers in Iraq (Operation New Dawn) Afghanistan (Operation Enduring Freedom), and the U.S. Central Command (USCENTCOM) area of responsibility. The number of contractors used for private security is separated from the overall tally. Reports are issued quarterly, each fiscal year beginning in August 2008 to the present.

Iraq and Afghanistan: DOD, State, and USAID Face Continued Challenges in Tracking Contracts, Assistance Instruments, and Associated Personnel (GAO-11-1)

Author: U.S. GAO
Publish Date:

 
Open PDF:
 

In this report, GAO assesses the implementation of the Synchronized Pre-deployment and Operational Tracker (SPOT) and data reported by the three agencies for Afghanistan and Iraq for FY 2009 and the first half of FY 2010 on the (1) number of contractor and assistance personnel, including those providing security; (2) number of personnel killed or wounded; and (3) number and value of contracts and assistance instruments and extent of competition for new awards. It includes comments from USAID.

Contingency Contracting: DOD, State, and USAID Continue to Face Challenges in Tracking Contractor Personnel and Contracts in Iraq and Afghanistan (GAO-10-1)

Author: U.S. GAO
Publish Date:

 
Open PDF:
 

In this report, GAO analyzes DOD, State, and USAID data for Iraq and Afghanistan for FY 2008 and the first half of FY 2009 on the (1) status of agency efforts to track information on contracts and contractor personnel; (2) number of contractor personnel; (3) number of killed and wounded contractors; and (4) number and value of contracts and extent to which they were awarded competitively. It includes recommendations by the GAO and comments by the Departments of Defense and State and the U.S. Agency for International Development.

Contingency Contracting: DOD, State, and USAID Contracts and Contractor Personnel in Iraq and Afghanistan (GAO-09-19)

Author: U.S. GAO
Publish Date:

 
Open PDF:
 

In this report, GAO analyzed DOD, State, and USAID data on contracting activities in Iraq and Afghanistan for fiscal year 2007 and the first half of fiscal year 2008 including (1) the number and value of contracts and the extent they were awarded competitively; (2) the number of contractor personnel, including those performing security functions; and (3) the number of contractor personnel who were killed or wounded. GAO also reviewed the status of the three agencies’ memorandum of understanding related to maintaining data on contracts and contractor personnel.

Number of Armed Contractors in Iraq and Afghanistan

U.S. Department of Defense Census Statistics by Fiscal Year Quarter, Contractor Support of U.S. Operations in the U.S. CENTCOM Area of Responsibility, Iraq and Afghanistan

Author: U.S. Department of Defense
Publish Date:

 

These reports contain DOD contractor personnel numbers in Iraq (Operation New Dawn) Afghanistan (Operation Enduring Freedom), and the U.S. Central Command (USCENTCOM) area of responsibility. The number of contractors used for private security is separated from the overall tally. Reports are issued quarterly, each fiscal year beginning in August 2008 to the present.

Number of U.S. versus Foreign Workers in Iraq and Afghanistan

U.S. Department of Defense Census Statistics by Fiscal Year Quarter, Contractor Support of U.S. Operations in the U.S. CENTCOM Area of Responsibility, Iraq and Afghanistan

Author: U.S. Department of Defense
Publish Date:

 

These reports contain DOD contractor personnel numbers in Iraq (Operation New Dawn) Afghanistan (Operation Enduring Freedom), and the U.S. Central Command (USCENTCOM) area of responsibility. The number of contractors used for private security is separated from the overall tally. Reports are issued quarterly, each fiscal year beginning in August 2008 to the present.

Number of Serious Incidents Involving U.S. Government Contractors

Federal Contractor Misconduct Database

Author: Project On Government Oversight (POGO)
Publish Date:

 

The Project On Government Oversight (POGO) provides data on instances of misconduct such as contract fraud by U.S. government contractors. 

Survey of Security Incidents Reported by Private Security Contractors of USAID/Iraq’s Contractors and Grantees (E-267-11-001-S)

Author: USAID OIG
Publish Date:

 
Open PDF:
 

The purpose of this survey was (1) to determine the number of serious security incidents involving private security contractors that occurred between July 1, 2007, and June 30, 2009, and (2) to follow up on the effectiveness of the USAID mission’s and implementing partners’ actions in implementing March 2009 audit report recommendations.  The survey found that USAID/Iraq’s implementing partners did not establish procedures to monitor reporting of serious security incidents and did not consistently report incidents as required by the prior audit recommendations.

Investigation and Remediation Records Concerning Incidents of Weapons Discharges by Private Security Contractors Can Be Improved (SIGIR 09-023)

Author: SIGIR
Publish Date:

 
Open PDF:
 

This report focuses on the Department of Defense’s oversight of incidents involving the firing of weapons reported from May 2008 through February 2009 by its PSCs.  Specifically, the report examines (1) the number and types of serious incidents involving weapons discharges and (2) the extent to which actions taken to investigate and remediate these incidents can be verified.

Injuries and Deaths to Government Contractors

ProPublica: Map: Injuries and Deaths to Civilian Contractors in Iraq and Afghanistan by U.S. State

Author: ProPublica
Publish Date:

 

As part of ProPublica’s investigation “Disposable Army: Civilian Contractors in Iraq and Afghanistan” into the federally financed workers' compensation program that provides medical insurance to injured war contractors, journalists created a map of civilian contractors by U.S. state who were injured or killed in Iraq and Afghanistan. The map was created in 2008.

Contractor Injuries and Deaths

Author: U.S. Department of Labor
Publish Date:

 

Under the U.S. Defense Base Act, American defense contractors are obliged to report the war zone deaths and injuries of their employees—including subcontractors and foreign workers—to the Department of Labor Office of Workers’ Compensation Programs (OWCP). The OWCP compiles reports based on this information and also based on claims submitted by injured workers and their survivors in the event of death. Only one case is created for each occurrence, so even if the injury or death is reported by the employer and employee or family, it is only counted once.

ProPublica: Map: Injuries and Deaths to Civilian Contractors in Iraq and Afghanistan by Country

Author: ProPublica
Publish Date:

 

As part of ProPublica’s investigation “Disposable Army: Civilian Contractors in Iraq and Afghanistan” into the federally financed workers' compensation program that provides medical insurance to injured war contractors, journalists created a map of civilian contractors by country who were injured or killed in Iraq and Afghanistan. Outside of the United States, which has had some 18,000 contractors injured or killed in Iraq and Afghanistan, India has the most with 381 contractors injured or killed. The map was created in 2008. 

iCasualty.org Contractor Deaths: Iraq

Publish Date:

 

iCasualty compiles its list of Iraq Coalition casualties from news reports around the world. The list is not said to be comprehensive but each casualty is linked to the news source which reported it. 

Dead Contractors: The Un-Examined Effect of Surrogates on the Public’s Casualty Sensitivity

Author: Steven L. Schooner, Collin D. Swan
Publish Date:

 
Open PDF:
 

This article was published in the Journal of National Security Law & Policy.  When a nation deploys ground forces, an inverse relationship exists between the number of military deaths and public support. This stark and monolithic metric, which economists call the “casualty sensitivity” effect, requires close examination today.  On the modern battlefield, contractor personnel die at rates similar to —or indeed often in excess of —soldiers, yet the U.S. public and Congress remain largely unaware of this “substitution.”  This article explains the phenomenon, identifies some of the challenges and complexities associated with quantifying and qualifying the real price of combat in a modern outsourced military, and encourages greater transparency.

Iraqi Civilian, Police, and Security Forces Casualty Statistics (R40824)

Author: Hannah Fischer
Publish Date:

 
Open PDF:
 

This report presents various governmental and nongovernmental estimates of Iraqi civilian, police, and security forces fatalities. Because the estimates contained in this report are based on varying time periods and have been created using differing methodologies, CSR instructs readers to exercise caution when using them and to look to them as guideposts rather than as statements of fact.

 


Department of Labor Statistics

The Department of Labor compiles data on contractor injuries or deaths working for U.S. bases around the world. Under the U.S. Defense Base Act, American defense contractors are obliged to report the war zone deaths and injuries of their employees—including subcontractors and foreign workers—to the Department of Labor Office of Workers' Compensation Programs (OWCP). The OWCP reports are available by employer, by insurance carrier, and by country. For further explanation about the data, view the Department of Labor background information site. According to the Department of Labor, these reports do not constitute the complete or official casualty statistics of civilian contractor injuries and deaths. They are offered as general information to the public who may be interested in the scope of civilian government contracting overseas.

The following provides cumulative information on contractor employee injuries and deaths from 2001 to 2011 as well as fiscal year reports from 2009-2012. Previous fiscal year reports are unavailable. Starting in 2009, a quarterly breakdown of cumulative injuries and deaths can be found on the Department of Labor Statistics website.

Cumulative Report of casualties from 2001-2014

U.S. Department of Labor Defense Base Act Case Summary Report: Cumulative Report (September 1, 2001 through June 30, 2014)

Publish Date:

 

The U.S. Defense Base Act requires American defense contractors to report war zone deaths and injuries of employees, including subcontractors and foreign workers. This report summarizes all employee injuries and deaths from 2001 until June of 2014. The Department of Labor compiles the reports into data sets organized into three categories:

  • Employer: the company the injured or killed employee worked for
  • Carrier: the insurance carrier responsible for compensation
  • Nation: the nation in which the injury or death occurred.

Notably, the reports do not provide information on the nationality of employees injured or killed in operations. The Department of Labor also states that the reports are not official statistics nor necessarily complete.

Casualties by Fiscal Year (2009-2013)

U.S. Department of Labor Defense Base Act Case Summary Report: Fiscal Year Report 2013

Publish Date:

 

The U.S. Defense Base Act requires American defense contractors to report war zone deaths and injuries of employees, including subcontractors and foreign workers. This report summarizes all employee injuries and deaths for the fiscal year 2012. The Department of Labor compiles the reports into data sets organized into three categories:

  • Employer: the company the injured or killed employee worked for
  • Carrier: the insurance carrier responsible for compensation
  • Nation: the nation in which the injury or death occurred 

Notably, the reports do not provide information on the nationality of employees injured or killed in operations. The Department of Labor also states that the reports are not official statistics nor necessarily complete.

U.S. Department of Labor Defense Base Act Case Summary Report: Fiscal Year Report 2012

Publish Date:

 

The U.S. Defense Base Act requires American defense contractors to report war zone deaths and injuries of employees, including subcontractors and foreign workers. This report summarizes all employee injuries and deaths for the fiscal year 2012. The Department of Labor compiles the reports into data sets organized into three categories:

  • Employer: the company the injured or killed employee worked for
  • Carrier: the insurance carrier responsible for compensation
  • Nation: the nation in which the injury or death occurred 

Notably, the reports do not provide information on the nationality of employees injured or killed in operations. The Department of Labor also states that the reports are not official statistics nor necessarily complete.

U.S. Department of Labor Defense Base Act Case Summary Report: Fiscal Year Report 2011

Publish Date:

 

The U.S. Defense Base Act requires American defense contractors to report war zone deaths and injuries of employees, including subcontractors and foreign workers. This report summarizes all employee injuries and deaths for the fiscal year 2011. The Department of Labor compiles the reports into data sets organized into three categories:

  • Employer: the company the injured or killed employee worked for
  • Carrier: the insurance carrier responsible for compensation
  • Nation: the nation in which the injury or death occurred

Notably, the reports do not provide information on the nationality of employees injured or killed in operations. The Department of Labor also states that the reports are not official statistics nor necessarily complete. 

U.S. Department of Labor Defense Base Act Case Summary Report: Fiscal Year Report 2010

Publish Date:

 

The U.S. Defense Base Act requires American defense contractors to report war zone deaths and injuries of employees, including subcontractors and foreign workers. This report summarizes all employee injuries and deaths for the fiscal year 2010. The Department of Labor compiles the reports into data sets organized into three categories:

  • Employer: the company the injured or killed employee worked for
  • Carrier: the insurance carrier responsible for compensation
  • Nation: the nation in which the injury or death occurred

Notably, the reports do not provide information on the nationality of employees injured or killed in operations. The Department of Labor also states that the reports are not official statistics nor necessarily complete. 

U.S. Department of Labor Defense Base Act Case Summary Report: Fiscal Year Report 2009

Publish Date:

 

The U.S. Defense Base Act requires American defense contractors to report war zone deaths and injuries of employees, including subcontractors and foreign workers. This report summarizes all employee injuries and deaths for the fiscal year 2009. The Department of Labor compiles the reports into data sets organized into three categories:

  • Employer: the company the injured or killed employee worked for
  • Carrier: the insurance carrier responsible for compensation
  • Nation: the nation in which the injury or death occurred 

Notably, the reports do not provide information on the nationality of employees injured or killed in operations. The Department of Labor also states that the reports are not official statistics nor necessarily complete.

 


CENTCOM Data

The U.S. Department of Defense issues statistical reports on the number of contractors supporting U.S. operations in the U.S. CENTCOM Area of Responsibility, Iraq, and Afghanistan. The number of U.S. nationals, third-country nations, and local/host country nationals employed as contractors is reported. Reports are issued quarterly, each fiscal year beginning in August 2008 to the present.

CENTCOM Quarterly Contractor Census Reports

FY 2014

Contractor Support of U.S. Operations in the USCENTCOM Area of Responsibility (July 2014)

Author: Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense, Program Support
Publish Date:

 
Open PDF:
 

In 3rd quarter FY 2014, USCENTCOM reported approximately 66,123 contractor personnel working for the DoD in the USCENTCOM Area of Responsibility. This total reflects a decrease of approximately 12.5K from the previous quarter. The numbers of contractor personnel in other USCENTCOM locations (except Afghanistan) make up about 21.13% of the total contractor population in the USCENTCOM AOR.

Contractor Support of U.S. Operations in USCENTCOM Area of Responsibility (April 2014)

Author: Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense, Program Support
Publish Date:

 
Open PDF:
 

In 2nd quarter FY 2014, USCENTCOM reported approximately 78,638 contractor personnel working for the DoD in the USCENTCOM AOR. This total reflects a decrease of approximately 20.5K from the previous quarter. The numbers of contractor personnel in other USCENTCOM locations (except Afghanistan) make up about 21.85% of the total contractor population in the USCENTCOM AOR.

Contractor Support of U.S. Operations in USCENTCOM AOR, Iraq, and Afghanistan (January 2014)

Author: Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense, Program Support
Publish Date:

 
Open PDF:
 

In 1st quarter FY 2014, USCENTCOM reported approximately 99,057 contractor personnel working for the DoD in the USCENTCOM AOR. This total reflects a significant decrease from the previous quarter. The numbers of contractors in other USCENTCOM locations make up about 17.9% of the total contractor population in the USCENTCOM AOR.

FY 2013

Contractor Support of U.S. Operations in USCENTCOM AOR, Iraq, and Afghanistan (October 2013)

Author: Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense, Program Support
Publish Date:

 
Open PDF:
 

In 4th quarter FY 2013, USCENTCOM reported approximately 111,500 contractor personnel working for the DoD in the USCENTCOM AOR. This total reflects a significant decrease from the previous quarter. The number of contractors in other USCENTCOM locations make up about 17.4% of the total contractor population in the USCENTCOM AOR. A breakdown of DoD contractor personnel is provided detail in the report.

Contractor Support of U.S. Operations in USCENTCOM AOR, Iraq, and Afghanistan (July 2013)

Author: Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense, Program Support
Publish Date:

 
Open PDF:
 

In the 3rd quarter of FY 2013, the DOD contractor footprint in Afghanistan decreased by 5.5% in personnel, and contractor numbers in Iraq also decreased significantly. In both Iraq and Afghanistan the DOD is planning substantial contractor reductions for FY 2013, due to base closures, fiscal tightening, and drawdown of operations. 

Contractor Support of U.S. Operations in USCENTCOM AOR, Iraq, and Afghanistan (April 2013)

Author: Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense, Program Support
Publish Date:

 
Open PDF:
 

In the 2nd quarter of FY 2013, the DOD contractor footprint in Afghanistan decreased by 2.4% in personnel, while contractor numbers in Iraq remained almost identical to the previous quarter. In both Iraq and Afghanistan the DOD is planning substantial contractor reductions for FY 2013, due to base closures, fiscal tightening, and drawdown of operations. 

Contractor Support of U.S. Operations in USCENTCOM AOR, Iraq, and Afghanistan (January 2013)

Author: Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense, Program Support
Publish Date:

 
Open PDF:
 

In the 1st quarter of FY 2013, the DOD contractor footprint in Afghanistan had a slight uptick in personnel, while contractor numbers in Iraq remained almost identical to the previous quarter. Iraq contractors plan to decrease significantly in 2013 as the DOD consolidates operations. In addition, Afghanistan private security contractors will decline once the Afghan Public Protection Force takes over contracts on March 20, 2013. 

FY 2012

Contractor Support of U.S. Operations in USCENTCOM AOR, Iraq, and Afghanistan (July 2012)

Author: Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense, Program Support
Publish Date:

 
Open PDF:
 

This update reports DoD contractor personnel numbers in theater and outlines DoD efforts to improve management of contractors accompanying U.S. forces. It covers DoD contractor personnel deployed in Afghanistan (Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF), Iraq, and the U.S. Central Command (USCENTCOM) area of responsibility (AOR). In 3rd quarter FY 2012, USCENTCOM reported approximately 137,000 contractor personnel working for the DoD in the USCENTCOM AOR, a 10.5% decrease from Quarter 2

Contractor Support of U.S. Operations in USCENTCOM AOR, Iraq, and Afghanistan (April 2012)

Author: Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense, Program Support
Publish Date:

 
Open PDF:
 

According to this report in the second quarter of fiscal year 2012, approximately 153,000 contractor personnel were working for the DOD in the USCENTCOM area of responsibility.  This was approximately a .6% increase from the previous quarter.  The number of contractors outside of Afghanistan and Iraq make up about 16% of the total contractor population in the USCENTCOM AOR.  

Contractor Support of U.S. Operations in USCENTCOM AOR, Iraq, and Afghanistan (January 2012)

Author: Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense, Program Support
Publish Date:

 
Open PDF:
 

According to this report, in the first quarter of fiscal year 2012, the U.S. Central Command (USCENTCOM) reported approximately 152,000 contractor personnel working for the DOD in the USCENTCOM area of responsibility. The contractor to military ratio in Afghanistan was 1.1 to 1, while the number of contractors in Iraq decreased commensurate with the U.S. troop withdrawal. The report identifies the number of contractors performing security services and also contains details on DOD improvements to contractor management and oversight. 

 

FY 2011

Contractor Support of U.S. Operations in USCENTCOM AOR, Iraq, and Afghanistan (October 2011)

Author: Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense, Program Support
Publish Date:

 
Open PDF:
 

According to this report, in the fourth quarter of fiscal year 2011, the U.S. Central Command (USCENTCOM) reported approximately 175,000 contractor personnel working for the DOD in the USCENTCOM area of responsibility. The report identifies the number of contractors performing security services and also contains details on DOD improvements to contractor management and oversight. 

Contractor Support of U.S. Operations in USCENTCOM AOR, Iraq, and Afghanistan (July 2011)

Author: Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense, Program Support
Publish Date:

 
Open PDF:
 

According to this report, in the third quarter fiscal year 2011, the U.S. Central Command (USCENTCOM) reported approximately 175,000 contractor personnel working for the DOD in the USCENTCOM area of responsibility. In Iraq, 16.6% of contractors are used for security. The report also identifies the number of PMSCs in Afghanistan and contains details on DOD improvements to contractor management and oversight. 

Contractor Support of U.S. Operations in USCENTCOM AOR, Iraq, and Afghanistan (April 2011)

Author: Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense, Program Support
Publish Date:

 
Open PDF:
 

According to this report, in the second quarter of fiscal year 2011, the U.S. Central Command (USCENTCOM) reported approximately 173,644 contractor personnel working for the DOD in the USCENTCOM area of responsibility. The report identifies the number of contractors performing security services and also contains details on DOD improvements to contractor management and oversight. 

Contractor Support of U.S. Operations in USCENTCOM AOR, Iraq, and Afghanistan (January 2011)

Author: Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense, Program Support
Publish Date:

 
Open PDF:
 

According to this report, in the first quarter of fiscal year 2011, the U.S. Central Command (USCENTCOM) reported approximately 176,161 contractor personnel working for the DOD in the USCENTCOM area of responsibility. Over the past year there have been consistent decreases in Iraq and slight increases in Afghanistan. The report also contains the number of contractors performing security services and details on DOD improvements to contractor management and oversight. 

FY 2010

Contractor Support of U.S. Operations in USCENTCOM AOR, Iraq, and Afghanistan (December 2010)

Author: Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense, Program Support
Publish Date:

 
Open PDF:
 

This is a revised report. Previously for the fourth quarter of fiscal year 2010, the U.S. Central Command (USCENTCOM) reported approximately 194,405 contractor personnel working in the USCENTCOM area of responsibility (AOR). Because aspects of the earlier census appeared anomalous, a second count was undertaken. The revised count shows a total of 176,340 contractor personnel working for the DOD in the USCENTCOM AOR. In addition to this census, the report contains details on the DOD improvements to contractor management and oversight.

Contractor Support of U.S. Operations in USCENTCOM AOR, Iraq, and Afghanistan (September 2010)

Author: Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense, Program Support
Publish Date:

 
Open PDF:
 
According to this report, in the third quarter of fiscal year 2010, the U.S. Central Command (USCENTCOM) reported approximately 224,433 contractor personnel working for the DOD in the USCENTCOM area of responsibility (AOR). There was a decrease in contractors AOR wide of 10% this quarter, with significant decreases in Iraq and a steady state in Afghanistan. The report also contains the number of contractors performing security services and details on DOD improvements to contractor management and oversight.

Contractor Support of U.S. Operations in USCENTCOM AOR, Iraq, and Afghanistan (May 2010)

Author: Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense, Program Support
Publish Date:

 
Open PDF:
 

According to this report, at the end of the second quarter of fiscal year 2010, the U.S. Central Command (USCENTCOM) reported approximately 250,335 contractor personnel working for the DOD in the USCENTCOM area of responsibility. The report identifies the number of contractors performing security services and contains details on the DOD improvements to contractor management and oversight. 

Contractor Support of U.S. Operations in USCENTCOM AOR, Iraq, and Afghanistan (February 2010)

Author: Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense, Program Support
Publish Date:

 
Open PDF:
 

According to this report, at the end of the first quarter of fiscal year 2010, the U.S. Central Command (USCENTCOM) reported approximately 239,451 contractor personnel working for the DOD in the USCENTCOM area of responsibility (AOR). Compared to the fourth quarter FY 2009 census, the number of armed DOD PMSC personnel in Afghanistan increased by 12% and there was a 16 % decrease of armed DOD PMSCs in Iraq. The report ends with details on DOD improvements to contractor management and oversight. 

FY 2009

Contractor Support of U.S. Operations in USCENTCOM AOR, Iraq, and Afghanistan (November 2009)

Author: Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense, Program Support
Publish Date:

 
Open PDF:
 

According to this report, at the end of the fourth quarter of fiscal year 2009, the U.S. Central Command (USCENTCOM) reported approximately 242,230 contractor personnel working for the DOD in the USCENTCOM area of responsibility. The number of armed DOD PMSCs in Afghanistan doubled compared to the third quarter FY 2009 census. The report concludes with details about DOD improvements to contractor management and oversight. 

Contractor Support of U.S. Operations in USCENTCOM AOR, Iraq, and Afghanistan (August 2009)

Author: Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense, Program Support
Publish Date:

 
Open PDF:
 

According to this report, at the end of the third quarter of fiscal year 2009, the U.S. Central Command (USCENTCOM) reported approximately 243,735 contractor personnel working for the DOD in the USCENTCOM area of responsibility. The number of contractors in Iraq decreased while the number in Afghanistan increased.  However, there was a 19 % increase of armed DOD PMSCs in Iraq compared to the second quarter FY 2009 census. The report concludes with details on the DOD improvements to contractor management and oversight. 

Contractor Support of U.S. Operations in USCENTCOM AOR, Iraq, and Afghanistan (May 2009)

Author: Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense, Program Support
Publish Date:

 
Open PDF:
 

According to this report, at the end of the second quarter of fiscal year 2009, approximately 242,657 contractor personnel were working for the DOD in the U.S. Central Command (USCENTCOM) area of responsibility. While the overall number of contractors decreased, there was a 23% increase of armed DOD PMSCs in Iraq compared to the first quarter FY 2009 census, and a 29% increase of armed DOD PMSCs in Afghanistan. The report also contains details on the DOD improvements to contractor management and oversight. 

Contractor Support of U.S. Operations in USCENTCOM AOR, Iraq, and Afghanistan (February 2009)

Author: Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense, Program Support
Publish Date:

 
Open PDF:
 

According to this report, at the end of the first quarter of fiscal year 2009, the U.S. Central Command (USCENTCOM) reported approximately 259,400 contractor personnel working for the DOD in the USCENTCOM area of responsibility, an overall decrease that is attributed to revised reporting procedures.  A decrease in the number of private security contractors was also reported. Finally, the report contains details on the DOD improvements to contractor management and oversight.

FY 2008

Contractor Support of U.S. Operations in USCENTCOM AOR, Iraq, and Afghanistan (November 2008)

Author: Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense, Program Suppor
Publish Date:

 
Open PDF:
 

According to this report, at the end of the fourth quarter of fiscal year 2008, the U.S. Central Command (USCENTCOM) reported over 266,600 contractor personnel working for the DOD in the USCENTCOM area of responsibility. The report also identifies the number of contractors performing security services, contains information about the legal status of contractors, and contains details on DOD improvements to contractor management and oversight.

Contractor Support of U.S. Operations in USCENTCOM AOR, Iraq, and Afghanistan (August 2008)

Author: Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense, Program Support
Publish Date:

 
Open PDF:
 

According to this report, at the end of the third quarter of fiscal year 2008, the U.S. Central Command (USCENTCOM) reported over 242,500 contractor personnel working for the DOD in the USCENTCOM area of responsibility.  The report identifies the number of contractors performing security services, discusses the specific DOD guidance on arming contractor personnel and private security contractors, and contains details on the DOD improvements to contractor management and oversight.

FY 2007-2008 (Iraq only)

Contractor Support of U.S. Operations in US CENTCOM Iraq 2007-2008

Author: CENTCOM
Publish Date:

 

According to these reports obtained through a FOIA request, the total number of contractors operating in Iraq over the course of mid 2007 to early 2008 increased. The quarterly numbers jumped from 136655 in 3rd quarter 2007 to 163591 in 1st quarter 2008. The data is provided in an extensive spreadsheet.